The Kidwash Project: For the School

So I had lent my kidwash (http://www.bushwoodworking.com/2008/07/05/the-kidwash-project/) to my son’s school last year for their “splash day” and it was a hit. So this year, I received a request to build an additional 2 for use at the school for their summer camp.

You can see the construction fairly easily, but I’ll be posting the construction notes shortly so if you want to make your own version, it should be easy to replicate what I did.

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Hello Dolly

So my wife decided she liked a doll stroller that one of her friends had, and asked me to make her a replica. So we took a trip to Home Depot and got some supplies. A little bit of poplar, some 7/8″ dowels, and some bolts with lock nuts and washers. Instant doll stroller for my daughter (well, after 1 day of woodworking of course). My wife made a custom fabric sling for it, which has velcro so it’s removable for washing.

A couple coats of tung oil and some non-toxic danish oil should work just fine.

The first picture below is the original stroller.

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The Kidwash Project

(or for twenty-six dollars, how to create wet fun for everyone)

I was looking for a really cool (literally) summer project for the kids. So, after finding a very cool Instructable, I decided to hop on down to the local Home Depot.

The Kidwash is basically a sprinkler system, with a hose bid on one side to hook up a garden hose. It has mister nozzles to spray the kids, and makes for a really cool run-through-the-sprinkler project. You can even ride a bike under it according to the original plans.

I picked up everything on the instruction list. After getting it home, and finding out the mister nozzles wouldn’t thread, I got out my handy tap and die set and put some threads on the PVC right where each nozzle would go. Then I used some teflon tape to seal each and screwed them in. I cut all the PVC to length and glued it together. After everything was dry (about 2 hours) we turned on the hose, and had great results. The only thing I’m going to change is the height. It’s a bit short for adults. What? You think I wasn’t going to try it?

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UPDATE (18July08): This past weekend I added some threaded couplers and some extra pipe to add height and “storage-ability” to the project. You can disconnect it into three pieces, and it’s now high enough for adults without having to bend down to go through.

Helicopter Pad

I had some scraps of wood lying around the shop, some pine and plywood, and figured I’d put it to good use. My son needed another helicopter pad for his wooden helicopter, so I just knocked together a quick little pad for him with a little ramp and building. The ramp was just sanded down using a belt sander. I used a router to make the circular pad. I coated it with some non-toxic varnish oil from tried and true. He likes it.
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