Amp6 Basic Portable Enclosure

Woody had enclosed his Amp6 Basic that I soldered for him into a plastic case. After having wood case envy, he asked me if I could make a case for his Amp6 out of wood, that was a bit smaller than mine. So I did. See the pictures for my results. The wood is Anigre and an unidentifed species of wood that I salvaged off a pallet from work. 2 coats of high gloss Tung Oil is the finish.
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Load Block Project

A co-worker of mine asked if I could make him a glued-up block of hardwood for a specific work application. For my company’s yearly trade show (AAOS), they were demoing the amount of force that is applied to one of our knee products during a knee replacement surgery. The block of wood was to go between the knee joint and the load cell (which measures the amount of force used to insert the joint onto the existing leg bones). I made the block of wood 3 3/8 square and 1 foot long, and it was made with three pieces of anigre glued together with Elmer’s Polyurethane Glue (which is similar to Gorilla Glue). He finished it off by bandsawing the correct shape to fit the knee joint and coated it with a satin spray poly finish.

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Stool Sample

So it has been a request of my wife for a while to make a stool for my son. This is what I came up with. After trolling the internet looking for appropriate “samples” for a stool, I happened upon a nifty design similar to the one I made pictured. It has a movable smaller step, which converts the whole thing into a chair with a back. The movable step is made from walnut, with poplar plugs, and the body of the stool made from oak plywood, with walnut plugs. It has been glued, and screwed together, so it is very sturdy. It is finished with a non-toxic Danish Oil finish from Tried and True
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Plant Stand

So for Christmas, my mother in law wanted a plant stand. I had previously done a plant stand for my brother, which was cherry with tapered legs.
I decided to do something a bit different this time, so I got some salvaged pallet wood I had been saving, and got to work. It’s shaping up to be a pretty cool plant stand, with remnants of the pallet wood, like nail holes. I think the wood is african mahogany. I shaped the legs on the band saw, then used my spindle sander to smooth them down. The stand top is glued up pieces of the wood, and the crossbeams are fixed using glue and pocket hole screws. The finish I used is Maloof’s oil and poly mix, with a topcoat of Johnson’s Paste Wax.

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The Spokeshave Project

So here it is. My next tool. And it works too. I made a spokeshave. It cuts fine shavings with a small adjustment of the blade, easily done with two brass screws underneath the blade, after loosening the blade from its brass knobs.

The brass pieces were milled for me by someone at my job, who works in our prototype shop. I filed them a bit for the tool to work properly, and then sanded them down using progressively finer grits of silicon carbide paper up to 1000 grit. Then I used some polishing compound on a buffing wheel on my grinder, and made them very shiny. I then coated the brass with a bit of spray lacquer so they won’t tarnish.

The body of the tool was made from African Sapele, and the finish was two coats of tung oil, followed by Johnson’s Paste Wax. The blade was obtained from Hock Tools, and came ready for use. A very fine blade made by an expert, and the service from Hock was among the best I’ve worked with.

The tool plans themselves were from the #84 issue of Shopnotes #84 (my favorite woodworking magazine.)

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