Workbench Vise and Mount

IMG_20140119_160147I did a little shopping around, since I needed a workbench machinist’s vise for my workbench – as I plan to start doing some light metalworking (hush hush secret project) in the near future. After looking at Harbor Freight’s poor showing for vise options (mostly due to poor quality), I found a suitable 4.5 inch vise made by Record (Irwin) at Home Depot for a very affordable price. It’s a light duty workbench vise, so it’s not going to be a heavily used item. Once I got it back to the shop, I dreaded drilling holes directly in the bench and permanently mounting it – so I came up with a mount for it so I can clamp it to the work surface without permanently affixing it. I also made a front apron on it so I can use a leg vise I’m planning for in the very near future. The surface of the mount is 3/16″ hardboard over 3/4″ plywood, with a skinny wrap of cherry for edging to make it look nicer on the bench. It should come in handy. I also ended up purchasing a set of magnetic soft jaws at Lowe’s made by Bessey (a popular clamp manufacturer), so I can clamp oddly shaped items.

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Workshop Stools

IMG_20140112_132549After cleaning up my shop, I realized I had nowhere to sit at the workbench. While standing is supposed to be better for you, I also enjoy having the kids join me from time to time, and visitors, and everyone needs a place to settle occasionally. So I found a nice, simple plan from Ana White for a stool. I had to enlarge the top of the stool to 12″ x 12″ to allow the cushions my wife had made me years ago to sit on top. I ended up using walnut for the legs and rungs, and sapele for the top, with a few contrasting poplar plugs in the screw holes.

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The Captain Hat

And now presenting, The Captain Hat! Based on the same pattern design as the Harry Potter beanie (see Astromech Companion post), I did a 104 stitch-around-sized hat on #8 wooden needles using Dark Horse Fantasy Yarn from Crazy Girl Yarn Shops. My wife, m0mmacat, had to assist me in the last portion as I’m not that good at doing the decreases and color changes necessary to complete the star pattern. It was modeled from the shield design that Captain America wields.

I think it came out just fine.

Ravelry Project Link

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The Kidwash Project: For the School

So I had lent my kidwash (http://www.bushwoodworking.com/2008/07/05/the-kidwash-project/) to my son’s school last year for their “splash day” and it was a hit. So this year, I received a request to build an additional 2 for use at the school for their summer camp.

You can see the construction fairly easily, but I’ll be posting the construction notes shortly so if you want to make your own version, it should be easy to replicate what I did.

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The Kidwash Project

(or for twenty-six dollars, how to create wet fun for everyone)

I was looking for a really cool (literally) summer project for the kids. So, after finding a very cool Instructable, I decided to hop on down to the local Home Depot.

The Kidwash is basically a sprinkler system, with a hose bid on one side to hook up a garden hose. It has mister nozzles to spray the kids, and makes for a really cool run-through-the-sprinkler project. You can even ride a bike under it according to the original plans.

I picked up everything on the instruction list. After getting it home, and finding out the mister nozzles wouldn’t thread, I got out my handy tap and die set and put some threads on the PVC right where each nozzle would go. Then I used some teflon tape to seal each and screwed them in. I cut all the PVC to length and glued it together. After everything was dry (about 2 hours) we turned on the hose, and had great results. The only thing I’m going to change is the height. It’s a bit short for adults. What? You think I wasn’t going to try it?

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UPDATE (18July08): This past weekend I added some threaded couplers and some extra pipe to add height and “storage-ability” to the project. You can disconnect it into three pieces, and it’s now high enough for adults without having to bend down to go through.